Jerry Lee and Me

When the call came to write Jerry Lee Lewis's biography, Rick Bragg knew he couldn't say no

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What We're Reading Now: 'The Story of Land and Sea'

By Jessica MischnerA Southern FocusOctober 1, 2014

Author Katy Simpson Smith’s hotly anticipated debut novel, The Story of Land and Sea, recently arrived on shelves after sparking a bidding war among 10 publishing houses (Harper Collins eventually won distribution rights). Set in coastal Beaufort, North Carolina, during the waning stages of the Revolutionary War, the book chronicles in spare, crystalline prose the entangled lives and emotions of a multi-generational cast of characters. "The effect," writes reviewer Joanna Scutts in the Washington Post​, "is to root the novel in its historical moment but to reach toward the universal in its exploration of love and grief."

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Chef to Know: The Catbird Seat's Trevor Moran

By Jed PortmanGood EatsSeptember 30, 2014

American chefs of a certain caliber like to brag about time spent in the kitchen at Noma, the Copenhagen restaurant often ranked at or near the top of world’s-best-restaurant lists. The kitchen hosts apprentices from all over the world who spend a few busy weeks, or maybe a few months, working with the staff, mark the experience on their resumes, and return home. Less common, however, is the career path of chef Trevor Moran. As a sous chef at Noma, the thirty-something native of Dublin, Ireland, spent four years helping to direct the menu. Now, he is putting skills learned in Denmark to use in Nashville as the head chef at the Catbird Seat, a daring and intimate restaurant previously known for chefs Erik Anderson and Josh Habiger’s artful interpretations of American flavors: hot chicken skin with white bread purée, charred oak ice cream. Moran is making his own name with madcap dishes such as the dessert he served at last week’s Music City Food + Wine Festival, a potato-infused—and potato-shaped—cream puff buried in chocolate “dirt.”

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Style Dispatch: Jackets Required

By Haskell HarrisBelle DecorSeptember 29, 2014

Nashville, Tennessee, label Peter Nappi is known for creating beautiful, handmade leather shoes, bags, belts, and bracelets, but this fall, the company is adding apparel to that list in the form of four limited-edition leather jackets. It’s a fitting expansion, considering the label is based in a place where denim, boots, and leather outerwear have long been a uniform among the city’s most famous residents, from Waylon Jennings’ weathered leather vests to Jack White’s brooding black bombers. There’s a fine line between commercial and cool in Music City, and the collection strikes the right authentic note.

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A Private Orchid Pavilion in Savannah

By CJ LotzBelow the LineSeptember 26, 2014

There’s always more to every Garden & Gun story. In our October/November issue, we took you inside the stately Savannah home of Bill and Nancy Fuqua. Here, take a behind-the-scenes look at Bill’s private orchid house.

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My Town: John Fleer’s Asheville, NC

By Elizabeth HutchisonBelow the LineSeptember 25, 2014

After fifteen years in Tennessee as the head chef at Blackberry Farm, John Fleer and his wife Katy, both North Carolina natives, were eager to return to the Tar Heel State. “We’d had our eye on Asheville for a long time,” Fleer says of the Blue Ridge boomtown. “When we lived in Tennessee, we’d always stop on the way home to Winston-Salem. And over the years we watched it change and grow into this really vibrant community.”

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An Insider's Look at Modern Music History

By Jessica MischnerA Southern FocusSeptember 24, 2014

Photographer and Garden & Gun contributor Danny Clinch has spent the past three decades capturing the on-stage, on-the-road, and behind-the-curtain lives of some of the most famous musicians in modern history—from Ralph Stanley to Bob Dylan to Jay Z. The resulting coffee table compendium, Danny Clinch: Still Moving, out yesterday, contains nearly 300 images of artists of all genres and, as his friend Bruce Springsteen writes in the foreword, solidifies Clinch’s place among the greats of rock and roll photography: “Danny always gets it. The ‘thing’ you’ve been looking for. That small piece of the secret that has no name but that whispers to your audience…‘and then’… the story continues.” To understand the cameraman behind the camera, we asked Clinch to describe some of the biggest moments of his career and share some of his favorite images from the book—and the stories behind them.

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First Listen: Sons of Bill's 'Love and Logic'

By David ThierSouthern SoundsSeptember 23, 2014

They’re called the Sons of Bill, because that’s what they are: Abe, James, and Sam Wilson, the three sons of William Wilson, a Professor Emeritus of Literature and Theology at the University of Virginia. The Charlottesville, Virginia-based band, made up of the Wilson brothers, Seth Green, and Todd Wellons, formed in 2005, but started getting national and international attention with their 2012 album, Sirens

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Meet the Makers: Southern Wallpaper

By Haskell HarrisBelle DecorSeptember 22, 2014

Design trends come and go, but wallpaper has always been at home in the South, from the 18th-century trellis wallpaper hanging in the North Octagonal Room at Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello to the Rhododendron wallpaper designed by iconic decorator Dorothy Draper in the 1940s for the Greenbrier Hotel in West Virginia.

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Send Us Your Tailgating Recipes

By Jed PortmanGood EatsSeptember 19, 2014

Filbert, South Carolina, peach farmers and lifelong Clemson Tiger fans Ben and Merwyn Smith have been tailgating in the shadow of Death Valley for more than fifty years. 

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The South in a Jar

By CJ LotzGood EatsSeptember 17, 2014

You’ve likely heard of Tupelo honey, the South’s most prized single-flower honey, produced in and around the Florida panhandle when tupelo trees burst into bloom each spring. And you might know a little something about Sourwood honey, that deep and spicy nectar of Appalachia. But what about the dark, molasses-like honey gathered from Florida’s black mangrove, avocado, and loquat blossoms? Or the bright and grassy honey gathered from Eastern Shore butterbean plants? Honey is deeply nuanced. Like fine wine or whiskey, it’s layered in flavor, aroma, and history. The editors at G&G sampled varieties bursting with the essence of the South. The result of our sticky taste-test? Five honeys that will leave a taste of sweet Southern sunshine even when summer is long gone.

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